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 71 
 on: July 22, 2014, 07:29:12 PM 
Started by Doggie - Last post by Doggie
Hi

I am having difficulty finding information about the period 1816 to 1850 in the life of one of my great-great grandmothers on the FLETCHER side of the family.  She may have been born Mary BAISTER and changed her name to Mary FLETCHER some time before 1849.  I believe

1. She may have been baptised on 18 Feb 1816 in HOUGHTON - LE - SPRING, Durham, [Source - Transcription by Northumberland & Durham Family History Society from Northumberland and Durham Baptisms - Birth, Marriage, Death & Parish Records.]

2. From the 1851 census record mentioned below she could possibly have been born in HARRINGTON, near HOUGHTON - LE - SPRING.

3. She married Joseph RIDLEY at ST NICHOLAS CHURCH, NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE on 9 September 1849. [Source: Ancestry.com. England, Select Marriages, 1538–1973 (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.  Original data: England, Marriages, 1538–1973. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013.]

4. The record of the marriage at that Source shows her parents as William and Jane BAISTER.

5. The 1951 Census shows her as living in TANFIELD, Durham with her husband Joseph RIDLEY, her two sons - Edward FLETCHER (born about 1841) and Robert FLETCHER (born about 1849) - and Joseph’s children from a previous relationship.  [Source: Ancestry.com. 1851 England Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.  Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851. Kew, Surrey, England.]

6. The 1861 Census shows Mary, Joseph and family as living in CLOUGH DEAN, TANFIELD, Durham.  [Source: Ancestry.com. 1861 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.  Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861. Kew, Surrey, England.]

7. I hold a copy of the Birth Certificate of my grandfather Thomas Trueman FLETCHER, who was born on 24 Otober 1875 in CLOUGH DEAN, TANFIELD, Durham and died on 24 March 1942 in SHERBURN HILL, SHADFORTH, Durham.  It shows his father to be Mary’s son Edward.

I have come across an 1841 Census entry, which has a Mary FLETCHER (Sempstress, aged 25) living with Jane (aged 3) and Edward (aged 2 months) in GATESHEAD but doubt its relevance.  [Source: Ancestry.com. 1841 England Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010.  Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841. Kew, Surrey, England.]  The quality of the associated image is poor but the family could possibly have been living in West Street. 

Living in Hampshire visiting Family History resources in the North East is not really a practical proposition. Any information anyone may have and any help they can give would be most welcome.  I may be able to help with the cost of researching Mary and her Fletcher descendants should anyone else be looking into them.

Thanks in anticipation.

Keith

 72 
 on: July 22, 2014, 09:18:48 AM 
Started by MichaelBR1965 - Last post by MichaelBR1965
That will be the person I mentioned in my second post above I'm afraid - exact same name, same town but birth date two weeks too late and wrong parents :(

 73 
 on: July 21, 2014, 07:27:00 PM 
Started by MichaelBR1965 - Last post by joycewms
''Margaret Jane Scott born 4th June 1906''
Have you purchased this certificate? - Margaret Jane Scott South Shields. 1906  District South Shields. Reg 65 entry 178 found on the registrar's index -
http://www.southtyneside.info/applications/2/registersearch/default.aspx

For some reason it doesn't show up when searching with the forenames, but using ''Scott'' & the year & the year 1906 it appears in alphabetical order
Joyce

 74 
 on: July 21, 2014, 06:08:43 PM 
Started by MichaelBR1965 - Last post by MichaelBR1965

     I also did some work on the Darlings, a long time ago, for a descendant.  As lighthouse keepers they spread out all over the coast of England (I'm not sure about Wales or Scotland), their fame having maybe been spread somewhat by Grace's exploit.  However not all were in the lighthouse service.  Grace's only nephew named James (b 1846) was a son of Grace's brother William Darling (1806-1869) who was the light keeper on Coquet Island - at least he was there in the 1841 and 1851 censuses.  Nevertheless I have James as having been born in Bamburgh.  It might be worthwhile checking on the dates of eg Souter Point lighthouse at Whitburn and also the light at the end of the South Pier at the entrance to the Tyne.
Geoff Nicholson

He was born in Bamburgh,  ( Newham to be precise ) but he moved to South Shields and worked as a General Labourer in Westoe Village for quite some time. He died in South Shields in 1917. If you look on the 1891 census, you will see him married to Susanna (McKenna) Darling and her daughter , listed as Sarah McKenna is also living with them in South Shields although 4 years later when she gets married she has chosen to take the name Darling which is strange .

I have the marriage certificate for James Darling and Susanna McKenna and it shows his father as being William Darling, Lighthouse keeper of Brown Island on the Farne Islands.

You may be quite right about her simply moving on though, she certainly seemed to be sassy enough to do it with no problem !!!


 75 
 on: July 21, 2014, 09:27:26 AM 
Started by MichaelBR1965 - Last post by Geoff
Michael:

     This is a long list of questions - I hope you don't mind if I don't tackle them all at once!

     In the period we are concerned with, divorce was not either as quick, easy or cheap as it is these days.  Hence, if a marriage "broke down", the couple often just left each other and went off to live their separate lives.  Any subsequent marriage could have been bigamous, but comparatively few such cases became known about (or, at least, relatively few were prosecuted for it).  Susanna would have called herself a "widow" in order to account for her children, while her husband was possibly working in some other part of the country, or in prison, or in the Army/Navy, or had emigrated.

     I have also known what you have suggested - that a woman might use the workhouse as, effectively, a maternity hospital, just going in to have a baby, then again once the birth was over.  However, in my (research) experience, that tended only to happen when the child was illegitimate.  I once researched an otherwise quite respectable farming family from Hexhamshire, where the daughter had several illegitimate children, and went into Hexham Workhouse for each one, even though her father was quite well-off and they lived in a large and, for the times, no doubt luxurious, farm house.

     I also did some work on the Darlings, a long time ago, for a descendant.  As lighthouse keepers they spread out all over the coast of England (I'm not sure about Wales or Scotland), their fame having maybe been spread somewhat by Grace's exploit.  However not all were in the lighthouse service.  Grace's only nephew named James (b 1846) was a son of Grace's brother William Darling (1806-1869) who was the light keeper on Coquet Island - at least he was there in the 1841 and 1851 censuses.  Nevertheless I have James as having been born in Bamburgh.  It might be worthwhile checking on the dates of eg Souter Point lighthouse at Whitburn and also the light at the end of the South Pier at the entrance to the Tyne.

                                   Geoff Nicholson

 76 
 on: July 20, 2014, 08:16:25 PM 
Started by Susanne - Last post by Susanne
Meeting 10 July 2014:  (12 members) 
Members Forum   -   County Record Offices and other Archives
Susanne began this part of the meeting by presenting a virtual tour of Tyne & Wear Archives on powerpoint.  The ppt was kindly provided in return for a donation as visiting the archives or having a speaker come from there was not feasible on cost or organisational grounds. The virtual tour began with a brief history of Blandford House which was originally built around 1900 as the Co-operative warehouse and offices.  The archive catalogue is available on cards, in print and online.  Searchers need to consider the background to the archive they require.  Council hierarchies, for example, have changed, sometimes several times, especially since 1974. The library of items is quirky in its scope, with many hidden gems on its 12 miles of shelving. There is a considerable circus archive through one of the Fenwick family. Several examples of the holdings were pictured, including minute books up to 4 inches thick. Rescue archiving is an important part of the work done by the staff of the archive although they are now down to 2 out of a total staff of 8.  The film archive is at the University of Teesside with other North-East film collections.
The following discussion was in two parts.  Useful descriptions of other archives around the country, especially at Kew, Edinburgh, Sunderland and Carlisle were shared.  The talk then moved onto people’s memories of the Co-op building, as it was up until the early 1970s. Norman gave a particularly entertaining account of accompanying his uncle to buy a suit.  After ringing a bell on a long counter in a dark cavernous room a salesman would appear.  Samples were chosen, bolts of the materials inspected and measurements taken.  Some time later a letter would arrive with an appointment for the first fitting.
 The meeting was followed by refreshments and individual chats.

 77 
 on: July 20, 2014, 06:24:50 PM 
Started by MichaelBR1965 - Last post by MichaelBR1965
Hello , I am on the track of a very mysterious lady who was my Great Great Grandmother.

She was born in Yarm  in 1843 as SUSANNA CORFIELD  and appears on the 1851 census living in Cherry Lane Stockton.

In 1861 , she moved to Darlington , working as a House Servant to a local farmer & his family at Lark House, Low Consicliffe.

Now the mystery begins, she marries a John McKenna on 8th November 1869 at St Mary's Church , Stockton. John is listed as being 28 years old and is literate enough to sign the registry. Susanna is listed as being 25 and illiterate. The registrar has misspelt her name as Scofield but I know it is her as her father is listed as John and a comb maker (exactly as appears on the 1851 census for her father, John Corfield) and on later census she is listed as Susanna McKenna born in Yarm in 1843.

Her husband is listed as born in 1841, a riveter in a shipyard , his father is also called John McKenna , profession Joiner but deceased. There is no census record of a John McKenna having a ten year old son called John in 1851 in the UK making me think he is Irish.

Now comes the mystery - married in 1869 , daughter Sarah McKenna is born on 19th September 1872 in the Stockton Union Workhouse in Portrack Lane ! John (father) is now listed as a boiler maker, presumably in a shipyard somewhere so I am thinking he is not dead yet but where is he and why is the mother in the workhouse ? Did people go to workhouses just to give birth or does this mean she was an inmate ?

I can find no record of either parent (John or Susanna) on the 1871 census nor of the Stockton Workhouse to check.

The mystery deepens as Susanna turns up ten years later on the 1881 census living as a widow in South Shields with Sarah, her daughter (listed as Sarah M Kenna)  and a son (John Kerfreed) he has her misspelt maiden name (Corfield) as a surname (obvious a result of some indiscretion when she was a servant girl) - I can find no record of when and where John McKenna died although I think it may have been in Sunderland in 1873.

Ten years later,on the 1891 census  she has married the nephew of Grace Darling (the famous lighthouse keeper's daughter) - James Darling and is living in Westoe, South Shields. From there on in the trail is easy to follow to my own family.

I guess I am asking you people who are better at this than I am if there is anything else I can do to track down this mysterious missing chunk (1871 census) and the workhouse episode of Susanna and death of John McKenna - thanks ? :)

1) Why both parents are totally missing from the 1871 census !

2) What happened to the husband, John McKenna, where was he born and where did he die ?

3) Why has she moved from Stockton to South Shields on the 1881 census even though she is not yet remarried ?

4) Who is the son , listed as John Kerfreed (Corfield) born in 1868, the year before she married, there is no birth certificate, no death certificate and he appears on no other census return ?

5) What is she doing married to Grace Darling's nephew !!!! ??? lol

I think I need a tardis to get the answers unfortunately !

 78 
 on: July 17, 2014, 04:05:51 PM 
Started by Terry Thackrah - Last post by Terry Thackrah
Both Newcastle and Gateshead Registrars have now searched for me but without success, therefore the search goes on.

 79 
 on: July 17, 2014, 09:58:10 AM 
Started by MichaelBR1965 - Last post by Geoff
Michael:

     The Parochial Records and Registers Measure of c1980 requires all disused Church of England registers in which the last entry was made more then 100 years ago to be deposited in the Diocesan Repository.  For South Shields (Durham Diocese) that is Durham County Record Office.  In practice most clergy deposit all their older registers there, whether the last entry is more than 100 years old or not.  Transcribing therefore definitely does not require traveling around churches to look at the registers.  In most Dioceses that went out 40 to 50 years ago!

     Of course the first thing the Record Office does with a newly-deposited register, once it has been fumigated and catalogued of course, is to microfilm it, and copies of that are usually made available to local reference libraries and similar organisations, so it should not even be necessary to go to Durham to find one.  I am sure Gerry could advise you how you can most easily have access to a particular register once he knows which one it is (of the S Shields ones, anyway) and where you live.

     By the 1890s there would be somewhere about ten different C of E parishes in what was originally the ancient one of St Hilda's, al of them very populous.

     You, and anyone else interested in family history in South Shields - or just living there - will be welcome to attend any meeting of the NDFHS S Tyneside Branch in St Hilda's church visitor centre at 7.30pm on the third Wednesday of the month.  We don't meet in July and August so our next meeting will be on September 17th and will probably be a "members' night", ie in some way built around your own researches and problems.

     For more information, contact me (branch Chairman) on southtynesidebranch@ndfhs.org or Gerry Langley (branch Secretary) on sales@ndfhs.org

                                               Geoff Nicholson



 80 
 on: July 16, 2014, 06:12:37 PM 
Started by MichaelBR1965 - Last post by MichaelBR1965
I'd be delighted to help if I could - I work at home on IT projects and have a lot of spare time but if it involved travelling around Parish Churches in the North East - that might be more of a problem.
I'm specifically interested in the Parish Baptism Records of South Shields to try and determine why my grandmother (whom I have mentioned in other threads ) , was never registered at birth or after.

Thanks for the detailed explanation, Geoff, that makes perfect sense to me.

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